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24.1.10

COTTAGE CHEESE DUMPLINGS – TÚRÓGOMBÓC




No more TÚRÓGOMBÓC deprivation; There IS a way to make túrógombóc from cottage cheese; you just need the DRY CURD type. And the curds have to be mashed; smashed, pulverized, obliterated, destroyed! That is because the curds are not able to absorb the semolina, so dumplings made from curds will always fall apart in the simmering water. But by pureeing the curds first – dry curd cottage cheese becomes a type of soft cheese product that is suitable for making a pretty good túrógombóc! Jó étvágyat!

1-3/4 cups DRY CURD cottage cheese
2 eggs
1/4+1/8 cup semolina
salt
1/2 tsp baking powder
2 Tbsp oil
1/4 cup bread crumbs

Note: This recipe was designed specifically for dry curd cottage cheese and these proportions will not work with any other type of soft cheese product.

1. Process the dry curd cottage cheese.

2. Place the processed dry curds in a large bowl.
3. Add the eggs and stir to combine.
4. Add the semolina and stir to combine.
5. Add salt to taste and stir to combine.



6. Bring a pot of water to boil.
7. Form 6 balls in the palm of your hands.


8. Slide the dumplings into the boiling water.
9. Gently simmer until dumplings float to the surface.


10. Remove dumplings with a slotted spoon and drain.


11. In a large skillet lightly toast the bread crumbs in 2 Tbsp oil.

12. Pour the roasted breadcrumbs into a large heated bowl.
13. Slide the dumplings into the bowl, moving the bowl around to coat the dumplings.
14. Sprinkle with icing sugar and serve with sour cream.

  

16 comments:

  1. Here in Australia we don't have that dry cottage cheese. What can I do???

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Have 3 liter fullcream milk with 1 bottle buttermilk fermented until next day, than when there are sour milk slow cook in the oven at 70 grad celsius for a couple of hours. let the fluid drip off the solids with a muslin or very fine clean cooking cloth. (My mother had always boiled the cloths on the stove before using it, careful do not burn yourself!). Good luck.

      Delete
    2. Fullcream milk is unpasteurized milk as it comes from the animal. It is a commodity not many of us has access to. But sure, if you can get it, you won't even need the buttermilk.

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  2. That would probably require industrial processing, so I would just forget about the dry curd. I developed this recipe over time to utilize what is available where I live. So I would start with making real turo: my turo recipe is titled "HUNGARIAN CURD CHEESE". Just type it into the search window on the top left corner and it will be there if you scroll down. When you have the turo you can make the real turogomboc. Once again type into the little search window "CURD CHEESE DUMPLINGS" - and really, you will have a far superior dish with the homemade turo. Or you could start experimenting with removing the liquid from whatever cottage cheese, quark product you can get where you live. Beware; it won’t come to you overnight. Lots of mine ended up in the garbage before I figured out how to use the dry curd. Good luck!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Here in Florida We using Farmer cheese,same like the Hungarian Turo!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Thank you, I know that. I used it too while I could get it. Farmer cheese has not been available where I live for the past ten years. It is not the only thing that disappeared though. Local stores no longer carry chestnut puree either. I have to order in Hungarian paprika too. The stores claim there is not enough interest for these products. If people buy the cheaper, inferior Spanish paprika why should the store carry the more expensive Hungarian? I can see that there has not been an influx of European immigrants for several decades. Second generation immigrants are not as devoted to their ethnic roots as their parents were.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I love your website. My grandmother was Hungarian. She died in the 1940s though, quite a long time before I was born so I never got to know her, except through the stories of my father. So when I look at these recipes it always reminds me of
    my father and grandmother.

    I was wondering about the semolina.
    I live in the US and it is not available in my local stores. Would cream of wheat be a reasonable substitute?
    Thank you and thanks for the website!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Semolina, farina, cream of wheat are basically the same. [They are made from the endosperm of the wheat] Some are grainy and some are fine. Some are white and some are yellow, depending on the grinding process and the type of wheat used. Just don't try to use disgusting instant cream of wheat packets.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Instead of the roasted breadcrumbs, try the naked túrógombócs well-sprinkled with sour cream and topped with a mixture of ground walnut and powdered sugar. You will never return to the breadcrumbs, I promise.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Never make a promise on someone else's behalf. :-) I made it with walnuts once, but I still prefer it with toasted breadcrumbs.

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    2. Sari-my whole reason for eating turogombocs IS the toasted buttered, and sugared, bread crumbs. :o) Dipping bites into sour cream just gilds the lily. I happily will leave all of the ground walnuts & powdered sugar just for you.

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    3. I agree with Sue!

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  8. Hi there - could you use ricotta cheese? I used ricotta cheese as a alternate filling in making the traditional prune filled gomboc made with mashed potato dough. And I agree, the browned breadcrumbs are so good.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dry cottage cheese is very different. You could not simply substitute ricotta in this recipe.

      Delete
  9. is there a difference between semolina and semolina four?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I assume semolina flour is finely ground... however I am not familiar with it. Semolina is a grainy product.

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I began to post recipes for my family and it turned out to be a work in progress. "zsuzsa is in the kitchen" has close to 800 recipes of Hungarian and international recipes. They are organized into a cookbook format in "zsuzsa's cookbook". My new venture is "rethink the food". My food blog is evolving and so am I. You are never too old to learn or to make changes to what you eat or enjoy.

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