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MY COOKBOOK

4.8.11

HUNGARIAN POTATO FLATBREAD - KRUMPLIS LÁNGOS


Lángos comes from the Hungarian word láng or flame, because traditionally lángos was baked in brick ovens, close to flames. Nowadays lángos is deep fried from potato dough. It can be rubbed with garlic or spread with sour cream and/or with shredded emmental cheese or with sautéed shredded cabbage which is then called káposztás lángos. Made by street vendors as well as home kitchens, whatever you put on it, lángos is always a fabulous snack food.

1-3/4 cups + 2 Tbsp bread flour
1/4+1/4 cup of cream or milk
1 tsp sugar
1 pkg. rapid dry yeast
1 cup cooked potatoes
1-1/2 Tbsp butter
1 tsp salt

• Begin with the leavening. In a small bowl combine 1/4 cup of milk, 1 tsp sugar and one package of yeast.
• Sprinkle 2 Tbsp of flour on the top, cover and sat aside for proofing.
• Peel, chop and boil the potatoes until soft.
• Pour off the water and mash the potatoes.
• Add 1-1/2 Tbsp butter, 1/4 cup of milk and 1 tsp salt.
• Place the mashed potatoes in a bowl and set them aside to cool.
• Meanwhile place 1-3/4 cups of flour in a large mixing bowl.
• When the potatoes are cool add these to the flour and pour in the frothy yeast mixture.
• Combine the dough and kneed it until soft and very elastic.
• Place the dough back into the bowl and cover with a clean tea towel.
• Let the dough rise for 30 minutes, kneed again, and let rise for 30 more minutes.
• After the second rising shape the dough on a floured board into16 balls.
• In a large cooking pot, heat 2 inches of vegetable oil.
• Place a little oil on the board and shape one ball into a flatbread with your hands.
• Lower the flatbread into the frying oil.
• As soon as a flatbread is placed in the oil, quickly flatten out the next ball and shape it into a flatbread.
• Return to the frying flatbread, turn it over and fry until both sides are nice golden.
• Remove flatbread from the oil and place on paper towels. Sprinkle with salt.
• After all the flatbreads are fried one by one, spread them with a topping of your choice.


12 comments:

  1. I will just try to forget I have seen this tempting flatbread here. I have recently had too much deep fried food...

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  2. Oh but the piece I had was sooo good! Yes well - I have to confess it was only sampled... I made it for the sake of my emerging cookbook. Generally if there are no takers for something I have made, it is sadly discarded as most of these were. As my friend was leaving yesterday [after sampling the pavlova and taking 2 slices home], she complained about the two pounds she put on recently. Soon I may have to look elsewhere to unload the stuff I make. It seems like everybody I know is on a diet.

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  3. Hi Zsuzsa! My dad used to make these, they were soo good! I will use Your "recept" to try them out.
    My name is Zsuzsa too amd I live in BC too, mybe we can share some experiences personali.

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  4. Szia Zsuzsa! Beszelsz magyarul? Did you make the langos and how did they turn out? Good to hear from you. I live in Kamloops.

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  5. Hello!
    Was looking for Hungarian recipes and found all your inspiring photos AND recipes. Best wishes from Anne-Marie in Norway

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  6. Hello back and greetings from Canada!

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  7. I hope to make these langos soon however I'm curious how big the finished flatbread end up. You divide it up into 16 portions and that seems like a lot for something based on only ~2 cups of flour. Maybe the flour increases the amount...

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  8. Maria, when you divide the dough into 16 parts, agreeably they are tiny little balls that you roll into fairly thin disks about the size of your hand. The yeast makes them really puff up when you put them into the hot oil.

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  9. The picture at the top of the page makes them look plate/hand sized (6-7" in diameter) which is why I asked.

    Thank you.

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  10. they are about that size

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  11. Szia Zsuzsa! I got tears in my eyes when I found your blog, almost all your magyar recipes are what Anyu made, even your toltelek! Koszonom szepen for sharing- some, but not all of Anyu's recepts are written down and I now have a reliable resource to use. Gulyas and langos for our ujevi vacsora tonight.

    My name is Eniko; my edesanyam es apam came to America in '56, and I live in Reno, NV. I also get my paprika from Otto's in LA.

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  12. Hello Eniko and welcome to my blog. Your comment made my day!

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I began to post recipes for my family and it turned out to be a work in progress. "zsuzsa is in the kitchen" has over 800 recipes of Hungarian and international recipes. My recipes are organized into a cookbook format. On top of the page click on the cookbook to get access to all my recipes. If I ever figure out how to add a printer friendly gadget I will add it. In the meantime feel free to cut and paste. Happy cooking!

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