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8.9.15

TEMESVÁRI PORK SIRLOIN - TEMESVÁRI SERTÉSBORDA



Sertésborda translates as pork ribs. Except “ribs” identify an entirely different cut of meat [mostly bones] in English. Logistically it makes sense then to call this particular cut pork sirloin.    

This dish is basically a pork paprikás with wax beans. The reason I didn’t call it a paprikás with wax beans is because Temesvári Sertésborda is a well known dish in Hungary. It is a widely held belief to be a Székely dish that originated in the town of Temesvár, now called Timisora. Weather this is true or the dish simply bears a chef’s name, I do not know.

The one and only requirement is to use fresh beans. The flavour would be different with green beans and I would much prefer to use wax beans for this. Interestingly, Hungarians refer to wax beans as zöldbab, which means green beans. I never saw actual green beans when I lived in Hungary and I have never seen wax beans in Canada, [though I suspect larger centers would have them] so I wholly rely on my husband’s green thumb for wax beans. But alas the growing season is short and I must take advantage of it while the wax beans are tender. How young and tender the wax beans are makes a huge difference. Overripe wax beans cook up tough, stringy and in parts mushy. I did not make a vibrantly red paprikás and I left out the bacon to preserve the delicate flavour of wax beans. The original dish incorporates bacon slices; yes, the baconator is not exclusively American. I don't believe this dish requires added bacon, but maybe the bacon is what makes it a Székely dish.  If you recall the Erdélyi Fatányéros is topped with bacon as well.

Note: Temesvár was a major city in Erdély when it was part of the Astro-Hungarian Empire. Today the city is known as Timisoara in Transylvania and is part of Romania. Székely or Szekler is a Hungarian subgroup living mostly in Erdély/ Transylvania.


Temesvári Pork Sirloin

6-8 slices of pork sirloin
2 Tbsp flour
salt and pepper to taste
3 Tbsp oil
1 medium onion, finely chopped
1 tsp Hungarian paprika
a large handful of fresh, tender wax beans, end trimmed
1-1/2 cups pork or chicken stock
1 heaping Tbsp flour
1/2 cup sour cream


  • Wash the wax beans and trim the blossom ends. Very tender beans do not necessitate it, but if the beans are a bit stringy, pull of the strings too.
  • Wash the pork sirloin and trim off all the fat and pound out the slices very thin. I place the slices on a designated cutting sheet, cover them with plastic wrap and pound them flat [on both sides] with a meat tenderizer. I use clean wrap for every batch.
  • Season and roll the slices into flour.
  • On medium heat, pre-fry the slices in 3 Tbsp of oil.
  • Transfer the slices to a larger pot.
  • Add the prepared wax beans and set it aside.
  • Next, chop the onion very fine and sauté in the remaining oil until soft.
  • Sprinkle the onions with salt and paprika.
  • Give it a stir and pour 1-1/4 cups of pork or chicken stock on the top.
  • Pour it over the pork slices.
  • Bring to a simmer and slowly simmer, uncovered, for 25 minutes or until the wax beans are tender.
  • Meanwhile combine the remaining cold stock with a heaping tablespoon of flour and add to the pot.
  • Stir the sour cream into the pot and serve.






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It began with posting a few recipes on line for my family. "zsuzsa is in the kitchen" has more than 1000 Hungarian and International recipes. What started out as a private project turned into a well visited blog. The number of visitors long passed the two million mark. I organized my recipes into an on-line cookbook. On top of the page click on the cookbook to access the recipes. I am not profiting from my blog, so my visitors will not be harassed with advertising or flashy gadgets. Feel free to cut and paste my recipes for your own use. Publication is permitted as long as it is in your own words and with your own photographs. However, I would ask you for an acknowledgement and link-back to my blog. This is to my old on-line friends and visitors: policing the comment section for spam and answering questions has become a chore. Good wishes to you all, happy cooking and keep on feeding your people with good food.

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