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19.2.13

QUICK HUNGARIAN FLATBREADS - GYORS LÁNGOS



These are perfect and the refrigerated dough apparently lasts for a week. If you want you can have fresh lángos for a week. I like it with sour cream and grated white cheddar. You can also serve it with sour cream and purple onion slices or with a cabbage topping. For the kids, just sprinkle with cinnamon sugar or eat it plain. I lost count how many lángos I fried in the course of the week. Between the two of us 3 is the limit. The dough started to smell yeasty after 4 days, but the lángos was still perfect. I still have a large chunk of dough in the fridge and I am starting to think we may not finish it in time.
 
3/4 cup lukewarm milk
2-1/2 tsp instant dry yeast
1 tsp sugar
2 eggs
1/2 tsp salt
3 cups flour
 
• It is useful to have a standing beater with a dough hook.
• Place the milk, yeast and sugar in the bowl of a standing beater and sprinkle 2 Tbsp of flour on the top.
• Let it stand for 10 minutes. It is not normally required to proof instant dry yeast, but in this case it speeds up the process and makes a loftier lángos.
• Add the eggs and whisk together with a large balloon whisker until well combined.
• Add the salt and gradually start adding the flour.
• Switch to a dough hook or a wooden spoon and gradually beat in the remaining flour. • When the dough is formed beat for at least 4 minutes or until the dough is very elastic.
• Remove the amount needed and place the remaining dough in a plastic bag and refrigerate for an hour.
• Shape the dough into a ball, cover and let rest for 30 minutes.
• Divide dough and shape into large egg sized balls, and place on a lightly floured board.
• Flatten the dough balls and roll into about 3 mm thick disks.
• Let them rest for 15 minutes.
• Place a skillet on medium heat and add about an inch of vegetable oil. If you have an electric stove, give time for the oil to reach frying temperatures.
• Lower the flatbread into the frying oil.
• Turn it over and fry until both sides are nice golden.
• Place on paper towels.
• After all the flatbreads are fried spread them with a topping of your choice and serve.




13 comments:

  1. Hi Zsuzsa,
    I love langos! Lovely also with some grilled capsicum and cheese, with a dash of sweet chilli sauce.... Mmm yumm...

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  2. Now this brings back some wonderful memories, Zsuzsa. My Mom never made a batch of just Langos (too dangerous, both parents struggled with their weight) but she did always make a little extra bread dough and she made us Langos. I can still remember the texture like it was yesterday. My favourite was to take a piece of raw garlic, cut in half and rubbed over the surface, so fragrant and flavourful! We never had them with sour cream or cheese but I can see the draw. Would you have this for lunch, or a snack? My Mom's were just a snack because she usually only made 2 or 3!

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  3. I've wanted to try making langos for a while now but every time I have the time, there's already lots of bread products in the house.

    What kind of cheese do your shred and put on top of the sour cream?

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  4. Sounds good Maia. Good party food.

    Eva, that is the logical way to make it, from a chunk of bread dough. I come from a large family where langos was made in large quantities. So I still think of it as lunch with a soup. I would find it too heavy for a snack. But come to think of it langos belongs to the snack food category. The thing I liked about this one is how the dough lasts and lasts.

    Maria any white cheese will do, but my fave is white cheddar.

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  5. Zsuzsa,I haven't made Langos in years...just cannot trust myself to eat just one. Love the recipe and how it turned out. I never used toppings for them just rubbed cloves of garlic while still piping hot. Now, you've inspired me to make it again after all these years!

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  6. Elisabeth rubbed with garlic is the Hungarian way. That is how Eva likes it as well.

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  7. These are so lovely! I’ve never had Langos, but am looking forward to trying them soon!

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  8. Kathy vendors sell langos at open air markets in Hungary. It is eaten plain or rubbed with garlic or piled high with toppings. One of the most popular toppings are the cabbage topping [thinly sliced, lightly sauteed and flavoured] All are good.

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  9. These looks a lot like a flatbread that we have in New Mexico called an Indian Frybread. It's actually an American Indian bread. I love it and love smothering it with everything from honey to green chile. Your version looks just as delicious and I love the idea of the sour cream and cheese. I need to try this! Thanks!

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  10. It seems every culture has fried flatbreads. Bannock is Canada's First Nation version of fried bread. I am sure I have the recipe somewhere on my blog -- I certainly make it often enough. :-)

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  11. My recipe is the same but no eggs, just a couple Tbs of oil. An aunt who has been married to a Hungarian chap for 54 years passed it on to me, and it was a very old recipe then!

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  12. And right after frying, I rub raw garlic (preferably local or Spanish) all over and top with salt. Just amazing. Thank you for your wonderful cookbook, I often refer to it!

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    Replies
    1. Thank you for taking the time to write.

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